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  1. #1
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    USMC Customs and Courtesies

    I am a PFC stationed in Cherry Point, NC. All new marines in my shop have to give a pme when they first get here. Mine is on USMC Customs and Courtesies. I know everything boot camp has taught me, but i was wondering if anybody has anything they think i should MAKE SURE i address in my PME.

    Thanks

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  3. #2
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    Re: USMC Customs and Courtesies

    My biggest thing is using ranks, not just last name. Also addressing senior Marines in passing. Even if it's just an Oorah or ask how they're doing. Acknowledge the fact that they have done their time.
    We Deliver More Destruction Overnight Than Those Who Deliver Overnight

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    BEEN HERE A WHILE SENIOR MEMBER Trapper's Avatar
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    Re: USMC Customs and Courtesies

    Quote Originally Posted by marine4life View Post
    My biggest thing is using ranks, not just last name. Also addressing senior Marines in passing. Even if it's just an Oorah or ask how they're doing. Acknowledge the fact that they have done their time.
    Good job, Derek. Not one I remember being taught in boot camp, but a very good one to use.
    "Sie müssen ernst hin und wieder werden."

    -You have to get serious once in a while.

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    Re: USMC Customs and Courtesies

    Saluting the Flag
    Stopping your car while Colors plays
    Saluting Officers
    Salute or hand over heart during National Anthem

    I could give more but my mind is wandering I'm so bored
    We Deliver More Destruction Overnight Than Those Who Deliver Overnight

    It Ain't Bragging If You Can Do It

  6. #5
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    Re: USMC Customs and Courtesies

    I agree with the addressing senior Marines. Only the Air Force calls each other by their last name. We say the same thing in the fire service.
    Protecting Those That Defend America
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    BEEN HERE A WHILE SENIOR MEMBER lima33doc's Avatar
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    Re: USMC Customs and Courtesies

    Don't run just to get inside before colors sounds. Stop, stand at attention and face the flag even in civilian clothes.
    A young man who does not have what it takes to perform military service is not likely to have what it takes to make a living.
    --John F. Kennedy--

    Dave

  8. #7
    Super Moderator kmarier2001's Avatar
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    Re: USMC Customs and Courtesies

    Hey epmosich, just thought i'd say welcome to the board. Nice to meet you and thanks for your service to our Country!
    Proud Mom of Sgt Nick, USMC

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    Re: USMC Customs and Courtesies

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    BEEN HERE A WHILE SENIOR MEMBER V8403's Avatar
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    Re: USMC Customs and Courtesies

    You might Know this allready but Just in case

    6. MILITARY COURTESIES: There are two military courtesies: saluting and addressing
    officers and enlisted men, which will be discussed in detail below:

    a. Saluting: Since by its very nature, the life and discipline of the Marine Corps is formal,
    so the form of courtesy used by Marines must necessarily be formal as well. Courtesy is a disciplined attitude of mind. It promotes the willing obedience and unhesitating cooperation which makes a good outfit "click." When ordinary acts of military courtesy, such as the salute, are performed grudgingly or omitted, discipline suffers. Discipline and courtesy alike stem from esprit de corps. The salute is a military courtesy that requires much of an NCO's attention. As an NCO, you must recognize and teach that the salute is a privilege enjoyed by only the military, and
    is a mutual acknowledgment of comradeship in the profession of arms.

    (1) Individuals Entitled To A Salute: All military personnel must salute when they
    encounter and recognize any person who rates a salute, under circumstances in which the salute is
    required. An individual with the true soldierly instinct never misses an opportunity to salute a
    senior. Those entitled to a salute are:

    0107H-17
    (a) All commissioned and warrant officers of the armed services, the reserve

    components and the National Guard. These salutes are to be rendered whether the officer is in
    uniform or civilian attire.

    (b) Officers of friendly powers.

    (c) By custom, high civilian officials who are entitled to honors, such as the President
    of the United States.

    (d) Enlisted Marines, by other enlisted Marines, only in formation when rendering
    reports.

    (e) A common misconception is that you are required to salute enlisted recipients
    of the Medal of Honor. Notice that the key word is "required." This does not prevent you from
    saluting out of your own respect for the Marine and the Medal.

    (2) Special Situations:

    (a) After a senior has been saluted, if the individual remains nearby and no conversation
    takes place, no further salutes are necessary. On the other hand, if directed to report to a
    senior in the same area, you should salute when reporting and again when taking your leave.

    (b) A Marine salutes indoors only when under arms. This normally means a duty
    status with a weapon. In this situation the Marine remains covered and should salute; Marines not
    under arms do not salute indoors. In an office, Marines need not cease work when an officer
    enters unless called to attention. When addressed by an officer, the person so addressed should
    rise. Provision is also made for Marines performing duty with the U. S. Army or Air Force, in
    which saluting both indoors and outdoors uncovered is customary. Under these circumstances,
    Marines are instructed to adhere to the local practice.

    (c) An exception to the normal saluting practice is in the case of the prisoner
    chaser. A prisoner chaser does not salute an officer except when addressed by an officer in the
    line of duty. The prisoner chaser must devote his full attention to watching his prisoner.

    (d) As a matter of courtesy, it is most appropriate and encouraged to salute ladies
    with an accompanying greeting such as "Good afternoon, Ma'am" or "Good morning, ladies."

    (3) Comments On Saluting: A sloppy, grudging salute or a childish pretense not to
    notice the person to whom a salute is due, indicates unmilitary attitude, lack of pride in self and
    corps, and plain ignorance. As an NCO, never tolerate these unmilitary attitudes. When you find
    a Marine whose salute is poor, correct the individual on the spot and see that the correct way is
    known and practiced.

    b. Addressing Officers And Enlisted Men: It is appropriate and strongly recommended that
    a person be greeted by name and grade; e.g., "Good morning, Captain JONES," or "Good
    0107H-18
    evening, Corporal CLARK." If you are unsure of an enlisted Marine's name or grade, "Good
    morning, Marine" is as appropriate as "Good morning, Sir," in the case of an officer. In your
    everyday relationships with other Marines, it is imperative that you be familiar with the common
    courtesies extended to officers and enlisted Marines.
    (1) Addressing Officers: Use "Sir" whenever addressing officers; however, if
    acquainted with the officer, it is preferable to use both grade and name, e.g., "Good afternoon,
    Colonel SANDS." Whenever addressing a general officer, it is customary to use "General" in
    lieu of "Sir." When verbally addressing Generals, Lieutenant Colonels, and First and Second
    Lieutenants, use their short title, i.e., "Good morning, Colonel." It is an old-time tradition that,when you address an officer, you speak in the third party.
    EXAMPLE: "Would the Captain care to check the rifles now?" or "Sir, Staff Sergeant
    JANSON reporting for duty."

    (2) Speaking To Other Enlisted Marines: To promote pride and respect among your
    juniors, address them by name and grade. Avoid casual use of first name or nicknames. Senior
    enlisted Marines should also be addressed by their full grade and name, however, any NCO above
    a corporal may be addressed as "Sergeant" by a more senior Marine. At times the First Sergeant
    of a unit may be privately addressed by officers of a unit as "Top." He should, however, always
    be spoken to, and of, as "First Sergeant," by all other enlisted Marines. Such items as "trooper"
    and "EM's" should never be used. Always refer to a Marine by the grade, not pay grade. A
    sergeant is a "Sergeant," not an "E-5" or a "Sarge."

    (3) Informal Situations: First names and nicknames are proper with contemporaries or
    junior NCO's during social functions, during business hours in the privacy of the office, and in the
    NCO Club.

    (4) Miscellaneous: A common word in reference to a Marine captain is "Skipper;"
    however, it is more proper when used in addressing a captain company commander. It should
    also be noted that a Marine warrant officer wearing the bursting bomb insignia may be called
    "Gunner."
    J.E. Stevens U.S. Navy (Ret)
    Believing in honor, courage, and commitment, the United States Marine Corps helps keep our country safe by their steadfast devotion to "God, Corps and Country "

  11. #10
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    Re: USMC Customs and Courtesies

    thanks for the overwhelming response...if anybody has any other ideas, just let me know.

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